The 2018 MCS “Great British Beach Clean” – My Experience

As those who follow me on Instagram will already know, on Sunday 16th September, I took part in my first (official) charity organised beach clean – the 2018 “Great British Beach Clean”, and it was awesome! For the last 25 years, thousands of volunteers have gathered at locations around the country for a weekend event of litter picking, which the charity Marine Conservation Society credits as being the biggest in the whole of the UK.

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Found five cotton buds in a row here!

It was my first time taking part in an official event, and I have to say the day was extremely well organised. The team of 30 or so volunteers was made up of an entirely different group of people: Some old, some parents with young children, students, and quite a few fans of Blue Planet (Proving the power of mainstream TV). Ultimately whatever reason they had for being there, our goal was all the same: To rid our 100m stretch of beach, in a lively Somerset seaside town, of as much litter as possible. Turns out that’s a lot easier said than done!

 

Continue reading “The 2018 MCS “Great British Beach Clean” – My Experience”

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10 Fact Friday – Koalas

Kicking off the first “10 Fact Friday” is a cute, but not overly cuddly, Australian native – the Koala.

From the early 1800’s to the 1920’s Australia’s population of koalas took a massive blow, millions were hunted and killed for their fur. Since then over 80% of their habitat has been destroyed. The Australia Koala Foundation believes there are now between 43,000 to 100,000 individual animals left in the wild.

There more I researched these unusual creatures for this article, the more I realised what awesome animals they are! Some of the facts below are really interesting and I learnt a lot from them. Hopefully, you’ll find them as intriguing as I did?

Continue reading “10 Fact Friday – Koalas”

Natures Dedicated Mums

Moving on from my last post regarding Tahlequah, the orca who carried her deceased newborn calf through the waters of the Pacific Northwest coast for 17 days, I wanted to keep my next post relevant but a bit more on the positive side.

Killer whales are known to be great mums. After a 17 month gestation period, they give birth to a calf that is about 8.5 ft long and weighs around 120 to 160kg. Calves are typically weaned at around 1 or 2 years old and rely on their family pod to teach them vital communication, hunting, and survival skills. Resident killer whale calves will stay with their pod permanently, meaning mother and child stay together for life.

But what other creatures go above and beyond to care for their young?

Here are six other incredible animal mothers, who prove that the mother-baby bond isn’t strictly human.

Orangutans

Orangutans have the longest infant development period of all great apes. For the first two years of their life, they are completely dependent on mum. At this stage, they make the transition from hanging onto mum’s chest to riding on her back and dabble in eating soft foods – pre-chewed by mum. Of course.

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Bornean orangutan

At around 3 to 7 years of age orangutan infants begin to gain their independence, in this space of time they will be fully weaned, begin to climb, and search for their own food. They may also start experimenting with nest building, choosing to no longer share with mum but often staying in the same tree.

Despite this new found self-sufficiency, orangutan infants will remain close to their mothers for many more years to come – they will eat, sleep and travel together until the infant is around 10 years old. Female orangutans are known to visit their mothers until they are around 15 or 16 years of age.

The bond between mother and baby orangutans is one of the strongest and most beautiful in the animal kingdom.

Kangaroos

After a gestation period of around just 34 days, baby kangaroos are born extremely underdeveloped. At birth, the young joey is only about 2cm long and weighs less than a gram! It immediately crawls through its mother’s fur and into the safety of her pouch, where it will suckle solidly for 2 months. At around 6 months of age, the joey will leave the pouch for the first time, returning regularly to feed.

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Grey kangaroo

Red kangaroos will leave the comfort of mums pouch at around 8 months but will continue to suckle until around 11 or 12 months of age. Grey kangaroos, on the other hand, don’t leave until they are 11 months and can continue to suckle until they are 18 months old. That’s one patient mum!

Did you know? Female kangaroos are able to suckle two young at the same time – one in the pouch and one outside, as well as having another egg ready for implantation.

Alligators

Mother alligators usually lay between 3550 eggs in a nest of vegetation. During incubation, the mother alligator will actively stay near the nest and protect it from predators – that includes humans. After a 65 day incubation, the baby alligators will start calling to mum from inside the eggs, these high pitched squeaks let her know it is time to remove the nesting material. After all the hatchlings have emerged from the nest, their mother will carry them gently in her mouth to the safety of the water. The young will rest on her back as she swims and call to her when they feel threatened.

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Alligator

Although these reptiles have a ferocious reputation, they are in fact very attentive. The young will stay close to mum for around a year, but they can remain together as a pod for up to three years.

Great hornbills

Great hornbills are one of the largest members of the hornbill family. Despite having a 60inch wingspan and a weight of 2.15kg to 4kg, they choose to build their nests inside a large, hollow tree trunk. The breeding pair will work together to seal the opening of the hole shut – with a plaster made from faeces, chewed wood, mud and bark, and the female will remain trapped inside while she lays the eggs, incubates them, and cares for them once they hatch. The male will bring food to the female through a small slit left in the mud “door” that is just half an inch wide, large enough to pass food to mum and chicks, but narrow enough to prevent predators getting in the nest.

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Great hornbill

A clutch usually consists of one or two eggs that the mother will incubate for around 40 days. After the chicks have hatched the male may make up to 70 feeding trips a day, bringing everything from geckos, insects and berries to frogs and slugs.

For the different species of hornbill confinement for the chicks ranges from 50 to 90 days, by that time the mother has already broken out and resealed the door, in turn keeping the chicks safer for longer.

Elephants

Elephants are the largest living and biggest-brained mammal on the planet, so it’s no surprise they have the longest gestation period of any mammal too – 18 to 22 months to be precise.

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African elephant

For the first 3 to 5 years of an elephant calves life, they are totally reliant on their mother. In this time they will be taught many life lessons, such as how to use their trunk properly for feeding, drinking and bathing. This “baby stage” lasts from birth to around 5 to 10 years of age, once the calf has been weaned off mum’s milk completely.

Like us, adulthood for elephants starts at around 18 years old. Most male elephants will now leave the main herd, while the females will remain and assist each other with nursing and caring for the new calves.

And an honourable mention goes to the…

Strawberry poison dart frog

At only one inch long the strawberry poison dart frog is an alluring creature. Not only are they smart – their bright red and black/blue colouration acts as a warning to predators that they are extremely toxic, but they are also incredibly hardworking.

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Strawberry poison dart frog

Strawberry poison dart frogs mate during any time of the year, with the females laying between 3 and 5 eggs on a leaf. The breeding pair returns every day and the male will moisten the eggs by transporting water from his cloaca (effectively urinating on them). After 10 days the eggs hatch the mother frog will transport them on her back to the axil of the Bromeliad plant – depositing one tadpole per plant. Afterwards, the mother will come to each tadpole every few days and lay up to 5 unfertilized eggs for them to eat.

After 43 52 days the tadpoles will begin to undergo metamorphosis. Pretty amazing, huh?

What’s your favourite animal mum? Let me know in the comments below!

International Tiger Day – 10 Facts about the worlds Biggest Cat

Today is international tiger day! And I thought it would be a great opportunity to share some interesting facts on one of the world’s most recognisable and loved animals.

Sadly every one of the living six tiger subspecies: Bengal, South China, Indochinese, Sumatran, Malayan and Amur are classified as at least “endangered” on the IUCN red list. Three subspecies are already extinct, the Java, Bali and Caspian – driven to extinction through habitat destruction, hunting and an increase in human population. But thankfully after a century of decline, tiger numbers are slowly but surely increasing. In 8 years Bhutan’s Royal Manas National Park have seen their tiger numbers rise from 10 to 22 individuals, a small number maybe but successful none the less, with just 3,890 tigers reported living in the wild, every population increase is a step in the right direction!

Intrigued to find out more about the world’s biggest cat? Don’t miss my 10 facts below:

1) A typical tiger diet consists of various deer and wild boar, as well as monkeys, civets, buffalo and even fish, lizards and snakes. When favoured prey is difficult to find they may resort to eating rodents, small birds and insectsberries and grass also aid digestion.

2) Tigers’ hind legs are longer than their front, allowing them to jump powerfully. The muscles and ligaments in the hind legs are so well developed that they can jump 10 metres in one leap – that’s more than 32 feet!

3) The oldest discovered tiger species was unearthed in northwestern China and believed to be approximately 2.16 to 2.55 million years old – predating other known species by up to half a million years! The informal name of this jaguar sized species is Longdon tiger (Panthera Zdanskyi) and despite two million years of separation, scientists were surprised how similar the skull was to our modern day tigers – robust, well-developed upper canine fangs and a relatively long nose.

4) A tigress has a gestation period of 16 weeks (3.5 months) usually, they give birth to 3 or 4 cubs.

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5) The Amur tiger, also known as the Siberian tiger, is the largest of all wild cats in the world. Currently, they are listed as “endangered” on the IUCN list, with an estimated population of 400-500 individuals.

6) Tigers are the only bigs cats to have stripes – their skin is even striped too. Each and every animal can be identified by their own pattern of stripes, which is as unique to them as our own fingerprints are too us.

7) Tigers have night vision that is six times better than that of humans!

8) A tiger can run as fast as 35 mph (56km/h) but only for short distances, subsequently, most of their prey can outrun them, so that is why they’re ambush predators. For every 20 attempts at a kill, a tiger is only successful for one.

9) The main threat to tigers is poaching – their bones are used in traditional Chinese medicines, their pelts and other body parts like teeth, skin and claws as decorative items. Habitat loss and human-tiger conflict also seriously threaten the species.

10) Human beings have around 9,000 tastebuds in their mouths, meaning we have the luxury of being able to distinguish between sweet, sour, bitter and salty. Cats (domestic and wild) on the other hand only have 500 and this is one of the major reasons why tigers are able to dine on a meal of rotting flesh. They can not taste the decaying meat as you or I would, so it doesn’t deter them.

According to Wildscreen Arkive, the tiger is 2nd in the World’s Favourite Species list – an unsurprising but worthy vote. I was shocked however to see who grabbed the number 1 slot, head over and check it out for yourself, it’s quite amusing!

Are tigers one of your favourite animals, let me know in the comments below?